Solstice Saturday By The People Festival photo by Nicole Weissman
       
     
       
     
AD|TRA VERSE - ADVERSE/TRAVERSE
       
     
 SCENE 2 WAU WAU DEFA COOL Dancer is celebrating Africaness as it relates to the male form. The black male body has always been demonized; seen as violent, possessing super human strength and historically projected as void of emotion or feeling. Their humanity has been projected as “expressive of the cultural crossing, mixing, and engagement of Black male culture with the values, attitudes, and concerns of the white majority” - bell hooks. In Wau Wau the dancer confronts these societal folkways and reasserts a new narrative through tribal, freestyle and ball dance.  PERFORMED BY KEVIN WHITE.  Photography by Ja’Mon Jackson.
       
     
 SCENE 3 TUDO BEM Capoeira explores the beauty in movement as protest, the martial art of Capoeira was created by slaves as a tool with which slaves, an escaped slave, completely unequipped, could survive in the hostile, unknown land and face the hunt of the capitães-do-mato, the armed and mountedcolonial agents who were charged with finding and capturing escapees. This could be applied to a Martial setting in both combat and warfare which was called N'singa/ensinga. During the Atlantic Slave trade, this tradition transferred around theAmericas; Brazil (Capoeira), the Caribbean (Damnye) and the United States (knocking and kicking).  PERFORMED BY KWAKOU CLAY AND S-NEEMAH BARNES  Photography by Ja’Mon Jackson
       
     
 Photography by Ja’Mon Jackson.
       
     
IMG_8993.jpg
       
     
Cover Photo for Book
       
     
4/4 A MULITMEDIA MASH-UP CELEBRATING TWO DC CULTURES
       
     
4/4 a multimedia mashup of two dc cultures
       
     
4/4
       
     
4/4
       
     
4/4
       
     
Oral Histories for Oral Histories/Oral Futures
       
     
 A People's History of DC Arts and Culture
       
     
Simply Marvin: Live @ The Sugar Shack
       
     
Solstice Saturday By The People Festival photo by Nicole Weissman
       
     
Solstice Saturday By The People Festival photo by Nicole Weissman

Curation for Solstice Saturday evening event at the Art and Industries Building for the By The People Festival in collaboration with the Smithsonian Performance art by Nicoletta De La Brown and Shanna Lim. Solstice Soundscape by Les Talusan.

photo by Nicole Weissman for Halycon’s By The People Festival

       
     
KOKAYIKENCNTR

Snippet of an hour long black and white visual I designed for KOKAYI's Kennedy Center show in January 2019. The first track is untitled and features KOKAYI's father. It served as the opening of the show. The second track is entitled Dream Deferred which consists of sounds captured by various dc residents. Visuals include photography by Jamon Jackson.

AD|TRA VERSE - ADVERSE/TRAVERSE
       
     
AD|TRA VERSE - ADVERSE/TRAVERSE

Creator/Creative Director/Video Designer

AD/TRA VERSE is a multimedia performance and exploration of the African diaspora, through the lens and soundscapes of Matthew From Amsterdam which debuted at the Kennedy Center’s Millenuem Stage on September 21, 2018. The production featured music from Matthew From Amsterdam’s three albums. WATCH HERE

SCENE 1 GOOD ENGLISH There is an excitement and nervousness in navigating one’s new city as an expatriate. Days may be spent exploring and getting lost in your new country prior to getting one’s bearing or starting a new phase of employment. As an African-American woman you may find yourself confronting your own naivete, fears and beliefs. Inspired by Josephine Baker’s visit to Amsterdam and the city’s famed red light district the dancer interprets these emotions into a fluid piece to juxtapose the inner turmoil one my feel when leaving home and finding new bearings. PERFORMED BY HOLLY BASS

Photography by Ja’Mon Jackson.


 SCENE 2 WAU WAU DEFA COOL Dancer is celebrating Africaness as it relates to the male form. The black male body has always been demonized; seen as violent, possessing super human strength and historically projected as void of emotion or feeling. Their humanity has been projected as “expressive of the cultural crossing, mixing, and engagement of Black male culture with the values, attitudes, and concerns of the white majority” - bell hooks. In Wau Wau the dancer confronts these societal folkways and reasserts a new narrative through tribal, freestyle and ball dance.  PERFORMED BY KEVIN WHITE.  Photography by Ja’Mon Jackson.
       
     

SCENE 2 WAU WAU DEFA COOL Dancer is celebrating Africaness as it relates to the male form. The black male body has always been demonized; seen as violent, possessing super human strength and historically projected as void of emotion or feeling. Their humanity has been projected as “expressive of the cultural crossing, mixing, and engagement of Black male culture with the values, attitudes, and concerns of the white majority” - bell hooks. In Wau Wau the dancer confronts these societal folkways and reasserts a new narrative through tribal, freestyle and ball dance.

PERFORMED BY KEVIN WHITE.

Photography by Ja’Mon Jackson.

 SCENE 3 TUDO BEM Capoeira explores the beauty in movement as protest, the martial art of Capoeira was created by slaves as a tool with which slaves, an escaped slave, completely unequipped, could survive in the hostile, unknown land and face the hunt of the capitães-do-mato, the armed and mountedcolonial agents who were charged with finding and capturing escapees. This could be applied to a Martial setting in both combat and warfare which was called N'singa/ensinga. During the Atlantic Slave trade, this tradition transferred around theAmericas; Brazil (Capoeira), the Caribbean (Damnye) and the United States (knocking and kicking).  PERFORMED BY KWAKOU CLAY AND S-NEEMAH BARNES  Photography by Ja’Mon Jackson
       
     

SCENE 3 TUDO BEM Capoeira explores the beauty in movement as protest, the martial art of Capoeira was created by slaves as a tool with which slaves, an escaped slave, completely unequipped, could survive in the hostile, unknown land and face the hunt of the capitães-do-mato, the armed and mountedcolonial agents who were charged with finding and capturing escapees. This could be applied to a Martial setting in both combat and warfare which was called N'singa/ensinga. During the Atlantic Slave trade, this tradition transferred around theAmericas; Brazil (Capoeira), the Caribbean (Damnye) and the United States (knocking and kicking).

PERFORMED BY KWAKOU CLAY AND S-NEEMAH BARNES

Photography by Ja’Mon Jackson

 Photography by Ja’Mon Jackson.
       
     

Photography by Ja’Mon Jackson.

IMG_8993.jpg
       
     
Cover Photo for Book
       
     
Cover Photo for Book

My photo was used on the cover of Black Food Geographies: Race, Self-Reliance and Food Access in Washington DC by Dr. Ashante Reese.

4/4 A MULITMEDIA MASH-UP CELEBRATING TWO DC CULTURES
       
     
4/4 A MULITMEDIA MASH-UP CELEBRATING TWO DC CULTURES

Co-curator

4/4 was a two-hour multimedia experience at MLK Library showcasing DC artists, DJ’s, Dancers and pioneers in both the DC house music and hand dancing communities with each sharing their respective histories and stories. The show featured DJ Sam the Man Burns, Urban Artistry, Tamara Wellons, and the National Hand Dance Association. Part of the Our City Festival. WATCH A SNIPPET HERE

Co-created with Kristina Bilonick

4/4 a multimedia mashup of two dc cultures
       
     
4/4 a multimedia mashup of two dc cultures

4/4 was a two-hour multimedia experience at MLK Library showcasing DC artists, DJ’s, Dancers and pioneers in both the DC house music and hand dancing communities with each sharing their respective histories and stories. The show featured DJ Sam the Man Burns, Urban Artistry, Tamara Wellons, and the National Hand Dance Association. Part of the Our City Festival

Co-created with Kristina Bilonick

4/4
       
     
4/4

DC Hand Dancers

4/4
       
     
4/4

Audience photo

4/4
       
     
4/4

Dance party at the finale.

Oral Histories for Oral Histories/Oral Futures
       
     
Oral Histories for Oral Histories/Oral Futures

Curator: Oral Histories

'Oral Histories / Oral Futures' was a site-specific project staged during Funk Parade 2016. Six phone booths will be placed throughout the U Street neighborhood (see map below). Each phone contains stories of U Street's past and future, intended to be heard amid the cultural and built environment of U Street.

Phone booth sculptures by Alex Braden present these stories in audio format. The booths provide shelter and escape; an opportunity to look back and to look within; the opportunity to learn more about its history, imagine its future, and reflect on its present. Histories were curated by Seshat Walker from the DC Public Library's oral history project. Futures were created by artist Erik Moe as part of the project 'Future Cartographic Society,' drawing from conversations, walks and observations in the neighborhood.

 A People's History of DC Arts and Culture
       
     
A People's History of DC Arts and Culture

Co-curator A People’s History of DC Arts & Culture as part of the Meridian Lab

Co-curators along with Beat of the Blossoms and Art in Praxis

Meridians Lab: Experiements In art Change and Praxis was curated by Jessica Solomon of Art In Praxis at Transformer Art Gallery

Meridians was a highly interactive, ephemeral site for cultural work experimentation and the cross pollination of ideas and expereinces. Guidded by a set of meridians, specific pathways in which notions of art, change and praxis are explored, this site specific lab delve into Emergence, Feminine Economy & Radical Imagination.

A People’s History of DC Arts & Culture was a massive collective history of DC Arts & Culture. The DC arts community was invited to bring their memories, photos, fliers, etc to add to the timeline..

Simply Marvin: Live @ The Sugar Shack
       
     
Simply Marvin: Live @ The Sugar Shack

Creator/Co-Producer

Conceived original idea of a year long event series paying tribute to international icon Marvin Gaye titled Simply Marvin: Live @ the Sugar Shack for DC Commission of the Arts & Humanities Dance DC Opening July 22, 2011. Also worked on a team and assisted with marketing and promotion, secured some of the artists, hired and secured multimedia designer, and managed the stage.

WATCH A SNIPPET HERE